Archive for Louisville

In the Fall of the Year 2013

Changing Leaves

     Fall is a great time to jump in the car with the kids and head for our beautiful state. October is the most colorful month of the year in Kentucky. The state parks are either at peak color or soon will be. Although the Oak trees are still green, a variety of trees, from Dogwood to Sourwood and Blackgum to Maples and Hickories, among others, are in full color. Trees are showing off their glorious reds, yellows and oranges all along the countryside. And hopefully there will be some color throughout the remainder of the month.

But before you think about October, fall leaves, and the St James Art Show, we’ve got another event up our sleeves that we know you will absolutely enjoy. And all you’ll have to do is sit there and laugh. Of course, you’ll have to take a short drive to Louisville and stay in one of out fantastic bed and breakfasts.   If you come, you can be assured your evenings can be filled with scrumptious cuisine at one of Louisville’s fine local restaurants and, after dinner, you can enjoy the best theater you’ll find anywhere.

Actor’s theater

Actors Theatre of Louisville’s 50th Anniversary Season kicks-off September 3 with the hilarious comedy Noises Offone of the funniest plays ever written about the theater. You can find all the details on the season here.

hilarious comedic play

[Noises Off is] directed by Associate Artistic Director Meredith McDonough [and tells the story of] a troupe of manic misfits [who] unite to perform Nothing On, a sex farce stuffed with entrances and exits, mistaken identities, sardines and slamming doors—but the drama backstage is even more entertaining than the comedy on.  Noises Off, one of the funniest plays ever written about the theatre, brings the actor front and center for an evening of hilarity and impeccable timing (Michael Frayn).

Audience Advisory: Adult language and content.
Age Recommendation: Ages 15+
See more…..

Behind-the-scenes tech event-August 31

Enjoy delicious appetizers from Orange Clover Kitchen & More as you hear from Director and Associate Artistic Director Meredith McDonough speak about the rehearsal process and offer some insight on Noises Off. After this light reception, you’ll be invited into the theatre to watch part of a technical rehearsal for the show. It’s your chance to get a sneak peek at the production and catch a glimpse of what goes on during the rehearsal process! This event is free but ticketed. For more information, contact the Box Office at 502-584-1205. See more …..

50TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON AT ACTOR’S

Noises Off  Sep 3 & 4
Dracula  Sep 14 & 15
The Mountaintop  Oct 8, 9 & 10
Tom Jones  Nov 12 & 13   Extra Seat Passes Only
A Christmas Carol  Nov 26, 27 & 29
The Pirates of Penzance  Jan 7 & 8   Extra Seats Passes Only
Our Town  Jan 21 & 22
38th Humana Festival of New American Plays  TBA

Nancy Hinchliff, freelance writer/innkeeper

A hot Musical Summer: Louisville, 2013

This summer is going to be fantastic musically for Louisville. We are hosting a variety of awesome entertainers from One Direction to Bruno Mars to Mary J. Blige. There will be something for everyone, no matter the genre.

Concerts will be held in several different locations, all within a short distance from our wonderful bed and breakfasts. Tickets will probably go fast, so make your plans early. I’ve listed links to some of the concerts below and you can book wonderful rooms for a night or two at your favorite BnB at: www.louisvillebedandbreakfast.org.

Hope to see you there…..Nancy Hinchliff, freelance writer and innkeeper

 

Above: Mary J Blige, Keith Urban, and One Direction   

Hottest Tickets

Jun 2 – Ice Cube

9:00 PM Headliner’s Music Hall

Jun 16 One Direction with 5 Seconds of Summer
KFC Yum! Center Find tickets
May 25 Hollywood Undead
Expo Five Find tickets
Aug 18 Bruno Mars – The Moonshine Jungle World Tour
KFC Yum! Center Find tickets
Dec 15 2020-experience-world-tour-justin-timberlake-
KFC Yum! Center Find tickets
May 28 Daryl Hall & John Oates
Louisville Palace Find tickets
Sep 13 The National
Iriquois Amphitheater Find tickets
Louisville Palace Find tickets
Jun 14 Mary J. Blige
KFC Yum! Center Find tickets
Dec 8 Keith Urban
KFC Yum! Center Find tickets

 

Nulu: Part of the cultural revolution in Louisville, Kentucky

2nd Annual NuLu Holiday Open House
Date: November 17, 2012
Time: 10am – 7pm

Holiday Shopping Event Celebrating the Revitalization of Retail in the East Market District of Louisville, KY-
The East Market District is pleased to announce the 2nd Annual NuLu Holiday Open House, featuring local retailers and restaurants that will be open extended hours and offering specials/discounts and refreshments.

Students from Lincoln Elementary Performing Arts School will add to the holiday spirit with performances throughout the day along East Market Street. This family-friendly and open-to-the-public holiday shopping event will take place on Saturday, November 17th, 2012 from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. along East Market Street.

For more information
including a long list of participating retailers and restaurants
please see the EVENTS page.

First Annual Nulu Festival, 2011

Nulu: Part of the cultural revolution in Louisville, Kentucky

Twelve years ago, a cultural revolution began in Louisville Kentucky similar to the one that happened in Austin, Texas three years before that. It centered around a district less than a mile from the downtown office buildings and such favorite sights as the Louisville Slugger Museum. This five-block stretch has quickly become one of the city’s favorite dining destinations, rivaling the long-established Bardstown Road and Frankfort Avenue eateries. Several upscale dining establishments, such as Rye, which just opened in February, and Decca, a three-story restaurant and lounge that made its debut in March joined a growing number of cafes, bars, boutique shops, home goods stores and art galleries in the area.

East Market street in Louisville, was almost desolate for much of the 20th century, except for a few  merchants. Fortunately for the area, in 2000 Paul Paletti, an attorney, decided to open his law offices there. He was an avid photography collector and soon opened a gallery on the ground floor of his building.

Gradually other art gallery owners made the move to East Market Street. helping to transform the area to what is now known as NuLu. In November 2001, the  mayor decided to start a trolley hop the first Friday of every month that would stop at all the galleries in the area, which at that time didn’t even have a name. Pretty soon it came to be known as NuLu short for the New Louisville. The trolley hop became a huge success eventually bringing hundreds of both locals and visitors to the area.

Around the same time, Gill Holland and his wife, Augusta, former New Yorkers, snapped up properties in Louisville’s hip but slightly depressed East Market Street area, including a 110-year-old warehouse. They gutted it and transformed it into a cultural center named the Green Building. It opened in September of 2008 with an exhibition featuring nine local artists. On its ground floor, 732 Social, the second restaurant by the owners of the James Beard Award-nominated Basa, opened in October of the same year. Soon to follow were restaurants like:

1 Toast on Market 620 E Market St
2 Ghyslain Bakery, Breakfast/Brunch, French 725 E Market St
3 Mayan Cafe Latin American 813 E Market St
4 Harvest Restaurant American, Modern American 624 E Market St
5 Cake Flour Bakery, Coffee, Organic 909 E. Market Street
6 La Coop French 732 E. Market Street
7 Wiltshire On Market 636 East Market Street
8 Against the Grain Brewery… Pub Food, Sandwiches/Subs, Gastropub 401 E. Main St.
9 Decca Modern American 812 E. Market Street
10 Rye Tapas, Gastropub, Modern American 900 E Market St
11 Main Street Cafe  Breakfast/Brunch, Coffee, Sandwiches/Subs 217 E. Main St.
12 Please & Thank You Bakery, Breakfast/Brunch, Coffee 800 East Market Street
And many more.

Visitors will love this unique area, as the locals do. If you would like to attend Nulu’ssecond annual festival, check out the details highlighted above and be sure to book a room or two at one of Louisville’s amazing bed and breakfasts, some of which are within blocks of the Nulu district.

Nancy Hinchliff, freelance writer/innkeeper
website: amemorabletimeofmylife

A Ghostly Halloween in Old Louisville, Kentucky

You don’t have to stay home to celebrate Halloween. Locals or visitors within a couple of hours of Louisville, Kentucky can pack the kids in the car and drive over to Old Louisville, the third largest historic preservation area in the country. Once there, they will find plenty of treats at most every door as they go trick or treating in the spookiest neighborhood in the US. And, be assured, there will be plenty of ghosts lurking in the shadows.

Ghostly HalloweenIf you venture out on Halloween night, you’re liable to see ghosts peering from the silent gardens and leaning against many of the old iron gates. It is said that they sob from the windows of the Victorian mansions, crouch behind the bushes growing along the walkways, and sit on the steps of the Christian Science Church on the corner of Third and Ormsby. The tree-lined streets dotted with turn-of-the-century mansions are covered with gargoyles, chameleons, serpents, swans, turrets, and towers.

Bring your trick or treat carryalls. Knock on the huge antique doors lit by Victorian lanterns and punctuated with beautiful stain glass. Walk quickly past the hidden balconies, secluded courtyards, and secret passageways to avoid any unruly spirits. You wont regret it and the kids will love it. Thrills and chills await costume wearers of all ages.

If you decide to spend the night, there are ten beautiful bed and breakfasts to choose from, all situated in the heart of Old Louisville. You can book on the internet or call ahead to make a reservation. It’s an ideal location for taking advantage of all Louisville has to offer on Halloween. If it suits you or your family, you can spend the whole day and check out some of the activities available. Louisville loves Halloween and you will love Louisville.

Nancy Hinchliff, freelance writer/innkeeper

Call and reserve a Ghost tour (Tour the spookiest neighborhood in the USA)

The Spirit Ball/ (a gathering of spirits at the Conrad Caldwell Mansion)

Not By Bread Alone: A brief history

Louisville is fortunate to have many wonderful restaurants and Bed and Breakfasts. Visitors can take advantage of the suberb dishes served in both places. Good ole Kentucky food abounds here and many of the local chefs and inn-keepers are experts in bringing to you, not only wonderful evening meals and gourmet breakfasts but desserts of all kind. Kentucky has an unusual and interesting pie tradition many of which have unexpected ingredients. I have written a brief history of Pie below and included three Kentucky pie recipes for you to try at home.

On your next trip to Louisville, you will of course want to stay at one of our wonderful bed and breakfasts and savor the unique dishes the inn of your choice has to offer. In addition, your inn-keeper will help you find the perfect restaurant for your evening meal. (Nancy Hinchliff, Inn-keeper/Free lance writer)

* * * *

Historically, around the early 1500s, probably the first pies on the European continent, were called “coffins” or “coffyns”. They were savory meat pies with tall crusts which were sealed on the top and bottom. Open crust pies were called “traps”. These pies held assorted meats and sauces and were baked like a modern casserole with no pan.

The origins of pie can actually be traced to the ancient Egyptians, who incorporated nuts, honey and fruits into bread dough. However, according to most food historians, pie pastry actually originated with the Greeks. At that time they were made of a flour and water paste which was wrapped around meat to seal in the juices. The Romans took home Greek recipes and developed their own pies, cakes and cake-like puddings. The pie craze then spread throughout Europe, via the Roman roads, every country adapting them to their own customs and foods. English women were baking pies long before the settlers came to America, but by the 1700s American pioneer women often served pies with every meal.

 

Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, who used the pseudonym Mark Twain, loved pie and often ate Huckleberry pie baked by his life-longhousekeeper, Katy Leary. After a trip to Europe, where he developed a strong dislike for European food, he complained that “…it has been many months…since I have had a nourishing meal…” He ironically devised a recipe for “English Pie”. His tongue-in-cheek recipe, hinting at the awfulness if these pies, follows:

“…Take a sufficiency of water and flour and construct a bullet-proof dough. Work this into the form of a disk, with edges turned up some three fourths of an inch. Toughen and kiln-dry for a couple days in a mild but unvarying temperature. Construct a cover for this “formidable creation”, in the same way and of the same material. Filled with stewed dried apples. Aggravate with cloves, lemon peel and citron, and add two portions of New Orleans sugar. Then solder on the lid and sit in a safe place until it petrifies. Serve cold at breakfast and invite you enemies.” ( M. Twain)

* * * *

Many of the pies which became associated with Kentucky, came from the Shakers of the Amish in Indiana. Two very popular ones are the Sugar Cream Pie and the Shaker Lemon Pie. A third is Vinegar Pie.

The Sugar Cream Pie was a simple, basic, “desperation” pie made with ingredients that were always nearby or on-hand at the farm. When making this pie “finger-stirring” in the unbaked crust was necessary, so as not to whip the cream before baking.

Only three ingredients go into Shaker Lemon Pie : lemon slices (peel and all), sugar, and eggs. The filling is more like marmalade. Where did the Shakers get the lemons? It is said that they traveled in boats to New Orleans to sell their wares and returned with cash and lemons.

This is a very tart lemon pie which uses whole lemons, rind and all, inside the pie. They are first sliced very thin, then macerated overnight, four lemons to two cups of sugar. The key to this pie is slicing the lemons very thin.

When lemons were not in season, pioneer women baked pies with vinegar, which substituted for lemon juice. They were custardy and still had a fruit-like flavor from the vinegar. Vinegar Pie remained popular in regency England, throughout the nineteenth century, even after English settlers brought it to America.

RECIPES

Sugar Cream Pie
Ingredients
pastry for one 9-inch pie crust
3/4 cups sugar
5 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
whole nutmeg
Instructions
pre-heat oven to 450 degrees and prepare the pie pastry. Place sugar and flour in the unbaked pie shell. Add whipping cream and mix well, using you fingers to slowly mix the liquid ingredients. Add vanilla and continue stirring. Grate nutmeg over the top. Bake 10 minutes at 450 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 and continue baking, approximately one hour. Do not over bake. Remove from oven. The pie will appear runny, but sets when it cools. If the pie doesn’t set, get out some spoons and enjoy it anyhow

Vinegar Pie:
Ingredients
1 nine-inch pastry crust
4 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons melted butter
1/2 cider vinegar
Instructions
Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a blender or large mixing bowl, mix together eggs, butter, sugar and vanilla. Pour into pie shell. Bake about 50 minutes until firm. Let cool. Top with whipped cream.

Shaker Lemon Pie (late 18th c.)
Ingredients
2 nine inch pastry crusts
2 medium sized lemons
2 cups sugar
4 eggs
Instructions
Slice two lemons paper thin.Take out seeds and macerate the slices in two cups of sugar overnight. Stir the mixture now and then so that the sugar dissolves into a fragrant syrup. The next day, prepare pastry for a nine inch two crust pie. Beat four eggs well, then mix them with the syrup and lemon slices. Pour the mix into the bottom crust and cover with the top crust. Bake at 450 degrees for fifteen minutes, then reduce heat to 375. Bake an additional 20-25 minutes, or until knife inserted into pie comes out clean.

36th Annual Humana Festival of New American Plays: Feb. 26 – April 15, 2012

Humana Fest - Louisville, KYby Nancy Hinchliff, writer/Innkeeper

Actor’s Theater of Louisville is announcing their 36th Annual Humana Festival of New American Plays at a Kickoff Party on Thursday, March 1 at 6 p.m. in the Sara Shallenberger Brown Lobby. The free event, featuring delicious fare from local restaurants, Humana Festival memorabilia, giveaways and more, will bring in the Festival with much-deserved fanfare.” (posted by Actors Theatre of Louisville
Actors Theatre of Louisville)

It’s that time again. Time for Louisville’s wonderful Actor’s theater to present it festival of new American plays. If you’ve never been before, you’ll be in for a real treat. Actor’s is a top notch playhouse and the festival is one of the nation’s best. Started by Jon Jory, actor/director  in 1976,  it has continued to delight and surprise theater-goers with it’s amazing selection of plays written by upcoming and talented playwrights.

The Humana Festival has premiered the Pulitzer Prize-winning plays Dinner with Friends (Donald Margulies), Crimes of the Heart (Beth Henley) and The Gin Game (D.L. Coburn) and Pulitzer finalists Becky Shaw (Gina Gionfriddo), Keely and Du (Jane Martin) and Omnium-Gatherum (Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros and Theresa Rebeck) as well as Getting Out (Marsha Norman), Agnes of God (John Pielmeier), Lone Star (James McLure), In the Eye of the Hurricane (Eduardo Machado), Courtship (Horton Foote), Extremities (William Mastrosimone), My Sister in this House (Wendy Kesselman), Tales of the Lost Formicans (Constance Congdon), Danny and the Deep Blue Sea (John Patrick Shanley), Marisol (José Rivera), One Flea Spare (Naomi Wallace), Slavs! (Tony Kushner), The Batting Cage (Joan Ackermann) and Y2K (Arthur Kopit).

Actor’s Theater has received the three most prestigious awards given to regional theaters. In March 1979, they won the Margo Jones Award, presented for the encouragement of new playwrights. In May 1979, they received the Shubert Foundation’s James N. Vaughan Memorial Award for Exceptional Achievement and Contribution to the Development of Professional Theater. And in June of 1980, they became the second theater to receive the Special Tony Award as an outstanding non-profit resident theater.

If you decide to experience a night or week-end of unique and exciting  theater, treat yourself to an overnight stay or two at one of Louisville’s exemplary bed and breakfasts. Choose from a variety of styles and atmosphere, while assuring yourself that which ever selection you make, you will find an immaculate place of lodging, comfortable/beautiful rooms, friendly hospitality, and a wonderful gourmet breakfast. The Louisville Bed and Breakfast Association has nineteen members, with nineteen beautiful Inns for you to choose from. Most are within  fifteen minutes of  Actor’s Theater, some even closer. You may make your reservation on-line.

For names and descriptions of play, performance times, and ticket prices, you may check on-line at Actor’s Theater.

Valentine’s Day

by Nancy R. Hinchliff, inn-keeper/freelance writer

Valentine’s Day at most bed and breakfasts is usually very busy. They fill up with couples looking for a romantic get-away to celebrate the day or week-end with someone they love. The Inns offer Sweetheart Packages, Spa Packages and the like. They fill their rooms with red roses, champagne and chocolates. Louisville is no different than most cities. Our bed and breakfasts are exemplary and really outdo themselves on special holidays, especially the romantic ones like Valentine’s Day

Many of the inns like to serve a special sweetheart’s breakfast of Belgium Waffles with fresh strawberries and real whipped cream. Or, decadent chocolate waffles with whipped cream and a luscious ribbon of chocolate sauce dribbled across the top. Strawberries and chocolate seem to be very popular on Valentine’s Day, so many of the Innkeepers make chocolate-covered strawberries. They’re really not difficult to make. Below are a couple of wonderful recipes.

Be sure to make your reservations early. Some of the Inns have Sweetheart packages during the entire month of February. But, in case they don’t, call your favorite one and reserve as soon as possible.

Recipes for Chocolate Covered Strawberries

INGREDIENTS
16 ounces milk chocolate chips

2 tablespoons shortening

1 pound fresh strawberries with leaves

DIRECTIONS

Insert toothpicks into the tops of the strawberries.

In a double boiler, melt the chocolate and shortening, stirring occasionally until smooth. Holding them by the toothpicks, dip the strawberries into the chocolate mixture.

Turn berries upside down. Insert pick in Styrofoam for chocolate to cool.

Recipe from: Armida Cooks

Since it’s Valentine’s Day today, I figured I’ll re-post this oldie-but goodie recipe for Chocolate Covered Strawberries. If you want to impress your cutie pie, these strawberries are so easy to make.

Whenever I go to a fancy Sunday brunch, there are two things that I first look out for: the champagne and the chocolate covered strawberries. The recipe below is fool proof and delicious. Just make sure your strawberries are super dry before you dip them in the chocolate. Oh my gawd, I’m having cravings just writing this!

INGREDIENTS

2 cups (12-oz. pkg.) semi-sweet chocolate chips

2 tablespoons shortening, such a vegetable Crisco (do not use butter, margarine, spread or oil)*

12 large fresh strawberries, with stems, rinsed and patted dry

DIRECTIONS

Prepare cookie sheet by placing wax paper on bottom of it.

Place chocolate chips and shortening in medium microwave-safe bowl. Microwave at MEDIUM (50%) 1-1/2 minutes or just until chips are melted and mixture is smooth when stirred; cool slightly.

Holding strawberry by top, dip 2/3 of each berry into chocolate mixture; shake gently to remove excess. Place on prepared tray.

Refrigerate until coating is firm, about 30 minutes. Store, covered, in refrigerator.

*Butter, margarine and spreads contain water which may prevent chocolate from melting properly; oil may prevent chocolate from forming a coating.